?

Log in

No account? Create an account

Previous Entry | Next Entry

Safe as houses

After one bumpy ep, very definitely back full-force to the show I fell in love with. Even though each of the housemates has a decidedly separate plot, and the bonding is a little thin on the ground (with consequences clearly in the offing for that), it's tight and balanced and just feels right.

George moving out. ~sniffle~ I mean, we all know it can't hold, because we wouldn't have a show anymore, and of course we know we will still continue to have a show. Which does not at all make it impossible to ride along with Annie getting all discombobulated, and Mitchell trying to pretend he's not (a) discombobulated and (b) distracted in the extreme, about what Annie rightly terms the "end of an era."

The whole bittersweet Annie-George conversation where she admits to overreacting and explains that she hid his phone charger in the oven and some of his other stuff? SO MUCH LOVE. Love that Annie is totally matter-of-fact about "Oh, hi, I might have hid a bunch of your stuff like a pouty little kid because you are leaving us, and ZOMGSAD, but I'm a grownup and I'll deal. Really. Except that I might not necessarily remember where I put everything, so you'll just have to hunt for it, and I'm not going to mention how if you can't find things then you'll just HAVE to come back and visit like you promised." And I love that George totally gets what she's doing, and why, and isn't really even exasperated with her about it because he's recognizing how big a part of him feels the same way. This life-changing shit is SCARY.

George and Sam and Molly looking at the house was adorable and gooby and chock-full of déjà vu. Certainly for the audience (at least if they've seen the pilot), and probably for George as well. Too good to be true? Where have we heard that before? And what's wrong with this one might not be as nice as Annie -- Molly's nightmare certainly raises some questions there. Unless, of course, there's a talent that was already operating and this just happens to be the first we're seeing.

Either way, I'm loving Molly, and really hope nothing too traumatic happens to her. I know she's the kind of kid people think isn't like a real kid, and I agree that some of the things she says are verging on the overly precocious. But I do love that they get that little girls -- as in, say, 6-9 or so -- are, for the most part, not all shy and uncertain. That hits with the whole "tween" phase. Little girls pretty much live in a constant state of readiness to take over the world at the first opportunity, and that's Molly all over.

Sam is... nice, but I still feel like we hardly know her, and it's making me apprehensive that George hardly knows her. I was about to say I guess we really didn't know any more about Nina at the same point, but we did. We knew she knew what she did and didn't want, we knew there was a definite reason why, and we knew that she was willing to trust George with the knowledge of the consequences of whatever that was, even if she refused to specifically name it and be forced to relive it. Sam is sweet and levelheaded and maybe sells herself short a bit, so we have that much, but I still don't feel like there's much I can get a handle on there.

Annie and the rehabilitation of the Alan Cortez Experience: One hundred percent grade-A awesome. Steve, and Robin, and oh, oh, her mum, and of course Alan himself. Her mum, her mum, oh mercy me. *snif* Yeah, it was a little manipulative that Annie's mum just happened to show up just as Annie was connecting with this psychic guy. Do I care? HELL no. Mum's speech by the grave, about how she had been afraid of it because she was afraid it would somehow supplant her memories of the real Annie, but now she's learned that's not the case... So much gorgeous.

And here Annie's been worrying that her lack of corporeality will prevent her from making a difference! A whole new empowering experience, just as it seems both George and Mitchell are pulling inexorably away from the house and from her. No wonder she was going to go on tour with him!

And then she decided not to. It's clear that she's at least toying with the idea of choosing the door, of moving on in that way as the boys are moving on in their lives. But I have the distinct feeling there's something else she has in mind too. Or maybe right now it's just questions, I don't know. With Annie it can be hard to tell what she has in mind, or if it's anything fully-formed at all -- the emotional rollercoaster is still running full-tilt, even if she is better at riding it now. As a being entirely of spirit -- of emotion, in a sense -- that's probably something she's going to have to deal with as long as she remains on this plane. I think the boys know that, at least to some degree, which is why they just accept things like phone chargers hidden in ovens.

I have now taken to actually grabbing Mitchell's imaginary shoulders and shaking them in the air, so as to avoid yelling at him out loud and missing dialogue. *headdesk* He cannot possibly believe he's making sense, can he? He has to know, at some level, this "Fix me, please, I know you can fix me, you're the only one who can!" routine is pure irrational childish panic. Doesn't he? Please? *sigh*

And he gets a couple more whacks with the Clue-by-Four of Privilege, in the form of people saying "No." First Lucy, then Ivan. He really, truly doesn't get that he cannot always get what he wants just by asking for it. He really, truly doesn't get that this is not how the world works for other people. And, um, guys? He's never going to get that if you CAVE. Or at least waffle, in Lucy's case, which puts her a few points ahead of Ivan. (She then forfeits said points by getting her head turned around by Kemp's crazy, but that's a whole 'nother tangent.)

So instead he runs away as hard as he can from the cold hard truth he knows, that he's professed in so many words a dozen times. That nobody can fix him but him. The part he's never been so good at, the part he's really missing, is that it doesn't mean he has to do it alone. That he needs a whole support structure, not just one person to pin his hopes on, and set up to be blamed when they get dashed. And sooner or later they will. He will slip again. This is a red-hot certainty. The trick of accepting that without letting it be acceptable, of picking himself up and starting over again each time, is what keeps eluding him.

Which, hey, that's a tough one for EVERYBODY. Even when you think you know how to do it, when you've done it before, it can knock you for a loop. But if he's not even going to acknowledge that it's what he needs to do, that there are no shortcuts and no magic bullets, he might as well lock himself in that dungeon with Cara to starve and wallow in madness, because he's screwed. And who he could be -- hell, who he can be when he pulls it together -- has way too much value for that to be acceptable.

And it's about fucking time he told the people who value him most what's going on, so they can damn well tell him that in no uncertain terms. That extenuating factor I acknowledged a few eps ago, that the secrets he was keeping weren't just his anymore? That DOES NOT APPLY HERE.

You do not go home and hide your bloody clothes at the back of the wardrobe, and fail to tell THE PEOPLE WHO LOVE YOU that you have fallen off the wagon and landed on your scrambled little head.

You do not crow about the (absolutely, unquestionably joyful) news that you had sex with a woman who survived the experience, and fail to tell THE PEOPLE WHO LOVE YOU that you not only confessed to her what you are but found out she already knew. Not only is that not just his secret, it DIRECTLY AFFECTS THEM. He didn't even ASK how she knew, let alone wonder what else she knew.

A while back I said something about compartmentalization being a mental-health necessity for any vampire who values others' lives, let alone one with as murderous a past as Mitchell's. What I failed to mention, of course, was the potential for taking it too far. Which he's certainly doing now.

All this, of course, makes me more curious by the minute how this "fix me fix me please" thing ended last time. Who left whom, and why? The simplest logical answer is that he killed someone and couldn't face Josie, and I think it probably also makes the most sense with the fact that there's not even a whiff of a memory of rancor in their reunion in 1x05. She would have to have been disappointed but not terribly shocked or surprised, and given the person we've seen she was -- then and more recently -- the only regret would have been not having the opportunity to tell him she understood, because I have little doubt she did.

Which is, of course, the thing he really needs, and what he gets now, not from Lucy (though part of her wants to), but from Annie and George. Whom he's shutting out.

Shake. Rattle. Repeat. Argl.

I'm also very, very curious what would have happened if Ivan hadn't caved. And, as with getting him to join the program, I'm not entirely sure who was manipulating whom there. Possibly it was entirely bilateral. I'm still not ready to say I like him, but he's still entertaining, and certainly it's interesting to consider what's going on in that head of his.

You have your Daisy, do you? So how come we haven't seen you together since the first ep? *eyebrow*

Is it just me, or does an explosion not seem like the most efficient way to take out vampires? Granted, I'm sure it got a good chunk of them -- I confess my first thought was "Well, that's one way to take care of the population problem," which Mitchell had no good (or even acceptable, really) way to proactively address. But there will inevitably be survivors, and they will inevitably be REALLY REALLY PISSED OFF. Not to mention wounded, and we all know there's only one thing they can do about that. And gee, that's what Kemp and his boys want rampaging through the city.

Of course, I think at some level Kemp does want that, because it proves his point. Which puts him in a certain category of monster-hunting crazy that is a bit tiresomely cliché. I'm still hoping they have some tricks up their creative sleeves with him, but right now I'm assuming we just have to deal with that. Things become cliché for a reason, yadda yadda, and yes, it's not hard to postulate someone really responding that way. And we have Lucy being all conflicted to balance it somewhat. As well as Kemp's own inconsistency, I guess -- I do think he believes werewolves can be saved, possibly even more than in the freeing-their-souls-from-cursed-bodies sense we've seen thus far.

And he has been intriguingly silent on the subject of "Type II," which I expect to change, oh, pretty much now.

Y'know, right when Annie is getting into some soul-searching about what's next for her. ~meep~

Comments

( 34 comments — Leave a comment )
diannelamerc
Mar. 16th, 2010 04:18 am (UTC)
Is it just me, or does an explosion not seem like the most efficient way to take out vampires?

I was surprised by it (I figured guy-on-the-radio was heading an elite staking commando team), but then I realized that it actually makes a whole lot of sense. There will always be those who were late to the party or made it out alive, but there's a whole lot better chance for success and less for casualties on your own side when going up against stronger, faster, better armed, more ruthless opponents.

As for the rest... *is saying _nothing_*
wiliqueen
Mar. 16th, 2010 12:47 pm (UTC)
This is true, and as thanatos_kalos notes below, they could very well have the strike team ready to mop up the survivors.

But it still feels an awful lot like throwing a brick at a hornets' nest.
diannelamerc
Mar. 16th, 2010 03:16 pm (UTC)
But it still feels an awful lot like throwing a brick at a hornets' nest.

Oh, I think it's very much like that... the question is: was there any better way? (Presuming they were determined to do this.)
wiliqueen
Mar. 16th, 2010 03:27 pm (UTC)
Probably not, and they certainly were. You're right.

Which brings me back to Kemp knowing that innocent people will almost certainly die as a direct result of this action. And makes me curious as to whether the rank and file are quite as clued in.

I actually half-expected to find that the lead henchman had been recruited. Ivan seemed, if not actually suspicious, to think the gas-leak thing was a little odd, and let the guy in awfully casually.
diannelamerc
Mar. 16th, 2010 03:48 pm (UTC)
In retrospect (and at the time too, I admit, I hadn't gone there with the suspicion) I think he was more amused/annoyed than anything. "Yeah, Like *I* care about a stupid gas leak. Right. Fine, I can play the properly concerned human...."
wiliqueen
Mar. 16th, 2010 04:00 pm (UTC)
Which, apparently, is the accurate reading. I gave him too much credit for paranoia. Then again, I think Ivan's still at least partially in a place where he really doesn't care if everything gets blown wide open, if not actively hoping for it.
diannelamerc
Mar. 16th, 2010 07:27 pm (UTC)
Careful what you wish for? ;-)
wiliqueen
Mar. 16th, 2010 07:34 pm (UTC)
Ha! Indeed.
darkmagess
Mar. 16th, 2010 10:32 am (UTC)
I love watching you watch this show.

What struck me as so strange is the way that Mitchell devolved into this "I need you to save me" mess. Since when? He hasn't needed someone else to take control of him since we've met him, has he? It was very weird and very sad to watch him throw himself at Lucy.

I think part of the point with George and Sam is that George *doesn't* know her any better than we do. And that's part of what makes the whole thing batshit. He's so incredibly desperate to be normal that he asked a veritable stranger to marry him, essentially, because it looked good on paper. I don't blame Annie for hiding all of his things. This Cannot End Well is written all over that situation in the largest letters possible.
wiliqueen
Mar. 16th, 2010 01:18 pm (UTC)
He hasn't needed someone else to take control of him since we've met him, has he?

He didn't need to go looking for it. Herrick had it covered. Even when he wasn't directly manipulating Mitchell, Mitchell leaned on the structure that Herrick taught him to take for granted, without really being aware that he was doing it. I commented all through first season that it felt like he was pretty much picking up where he had left off at 21 or whatever, with maybe a few false starts somewhere in the last few decades, because Herrick molded him into a certain persona and prevented him from growing up as himself. And of course he started that as a ~21-year-old kid whose most recent educational experience had conditioned him to follow orders. Herrick didn't expect to need an heir, and he didn't train one. He trained a figurehead.

The incredibly rude awakening Mitchell has had about that this season, the pressure of trying to take responsibility not only for himself but for the whole vampire community, when he had next to no idea how it really worked... I'm amazed he pulled off the tightrope walk as long as he did, and not really surprised that, when he did fall off, his reaction was a childish and dependent one.

Why he then turned to Lucy is trickier. I think it was a combination of admiring that, for all that (she claims) her life is a bit of a mess right now, she is more mature than the general run of his social circle; the fear that this will be the screwup that proves too much for George or Annie to tolerate (probably with a chronic side of "why do they believe in me in the first place?"); and a weird, panic-scrambled iteration of the determination to show up and do things right this time after the last disastrous date.

As for why he said the same thing to Josie in 1969... Having to clean up the victims' flat with his own hands was a mini-preview of the wake-up call he's been going through lately. And it was her because she never seemed to run out of answers at a moment when he was terminally confused. He always has a certain level of need for someone to tell him what to do, I think; it just gets really acute in a crisis.

He's so incredibly desperate to be normal that he asked a veritable stranger to marry him, essentially, because it looked good on paper. I don't blame Annie for hiding all of his things. This Cannot End Well is written all over that situation in the largest letters possible.

Oh, yeah. And it's a credit to the creative team that I like (what little I know of) her and Molly so much, and it's so nice to see George happy with them even with the moments of misgiving that he keeps ignoring, that I hate that This Cannot End Well.

It's just now occurred to me that Molly's nightmare (or perhaps even pretend nightmare?) is not due to any kind of sixth sense or something in the house telling her things, but simply a very smart little girl making a leap of logic about the timing of George's mysteriously necessary absences.

Edited at 2010-03-16 01:26 pm (UTC)
darkmagess
Mar. 16th, 2010 01:30 pm (UTC)
I think I thought that her nightmares weren't actually nightmares. They were "mommy is getting close to some strange man I don't like so I'm going to make things difficult for them" play acting nightmares. Maybe I'm misremembering them, but I had this impression that Molly is so very on the ball in that impossible way that she was conniving it.

Mitchell did do surprisingly well being suddenly thrust into being a leader, a job he clearly didn't want and didn't know how to deal with. It's... paradoxical that he's managed to live so long and be less of an adult than George or Annie. But these are very Romantic notions, aren't they? That love can save him, that the monster can be redeemed, that just trying hard enough *will* actually be enough.

It makes sense why he fits so well with George and Annie when you say that Mitchell always in some way needs someone to tell him what to do. George is Mr. Superego. And Annie can tell him where his heart is.
wiliqueen
Mar. 16th, 2010 01:49 pm (UTC)
"mommy is getting close to some strange man I don't like so I'm going to make things difficult for them" play acting nightmares. Maybe I'm misremembering them, but I had this impression that Molly is so very on the ball in that impossible way that she was conniving it.

I think you're right. Either way, it's the form that caught my attention -- did she really hit on that "It was George, but it wasn't George" thing by sheer luck? Because she's on-the-ball enough to distinguish that she generally likes George, but doesn't like something he's hiding.

I do think it's points in his favor that Molly was forthright with him about catching him in the lie, and warned him not to hurt her Mum rather than assuming he would.

Mitchell did do surprisingly well being suddenly thrust into being a leader, a job he clearly didn't want and didn't know how to deal with.

He's way smarter than anyone has ever given him credit for, at least to his face. Lucy may be the first person to actually point that out to him. But coming from a background he describes as devoid of opportunity, then spending first the war years and then his vampire lifetime being what someone else told him to be, this has been his first opportunity to discover what he's capable of.

But these are very Romantic notions, aren't they? That love can save him, that the monster can be redeemed, that just trying hard enough *will* actually be enough.

He's nothing if not an idealist. He would never have been taken in by Herrick's Vampire Utopia bullshit if he weren't.

It makes sense why he fits so well with George and Annie when you say that Mitchell always in some way needs someone to tell him what to do. George is Mr. Superego. And Annie can tell him where his heart is.

Very true.
thanatos_kalos
Mar. 16th, 2010 12:15 pm (UTC)
(Warning: babble ahead)

In a way, I think part of this is Mitchell's own...hypocrisy is probably too strong a word here, but whatever is coming back to haunt him. He tells George over and over in s1 (and a bit in s2) that George needs to accept ewhat he is, that he can't hide from being werewolf, when all the while Mitchell is denying what he is (for noble reasons, I grant you). If he's losing the battle or being at all devious or whatever then he loses George and Annie's respect and also their friendship (remember in 1.1 when George actually hit Mitchell for falling off the wagon with Lauren?). He can't ask them to save him because if he does, then he admits he's vulnerable, but he can ask this stranger who he connects with because she doesn't 'depend' (in his view) on him. Also, she (he thinks) isn't corrupted-- and that's nothing to do with being a werewolf or ghost, but with being a potentially vengeful spirit (Annie vs Owen and vs the vampiers) and George murdering Herrick. I think Mitchell is terrified of bring the only real humanising forces left to him down with him. He needs to protect them from him, I think. It doesn't make a lot of sense-- watch the next 2 and you'll see why-- but I think it's what he's doing.

Is it just me, or does an explosion not seem like the most efficient way to take out vampires?

I'm with diannelamerc on that; plus, once the vampires are down/unconscious, you can stake any you find. But of course it would be a place of extermination-- the funeral home seems to be named after one of the DW Dalek operators! ;)

Annie and the rehabilitation of the Alan Cortez Experience

What I liked best about that was that it WASN'T the cliche'. Alan was a psychic, but thanks to a physical injury lost his powers. Annie helping was gerat, though, even if it was a tad coincidental that her mum showed up there and then.
wiliqueen
Mar. 16th, 2010 01:25 pm (UTC)
I'm not sure hypocrisy is too strong a word. And I think you're absolutely right -- he's terrified, every time, that this will be the screwup that drives them away. In that panic, he doesn't remember that after George hit him, he understood and supported him. He doesn't remember that Annie's rampage through the funeral parlor led to her learning vital information that she promptly brought to him.

It doesn't make a lot of sense-- watch the next 2 and you'll see why-- but I think it's what he's doing.

He doesn't understand why they still believe in him, and therefore can't trust that they will continue to do so. With that disconnect, it's very difficult for any response he has to make sense.

plus, once the vampires are down/unconscious, you can stake any you find.

True. There's nothing to indicate they don't have a strike team at the ready to mop up the survivors.

But it still feels an awful lot like throwing a brick at a hornets' nest.

What I liked best about that was that it WASN'T the cliche'. Alan was a psychic, but thanks to a physical injury lost his powers.

Yes! The whole thing just makes me giddy-happy.
thanatos_kalos
Mar. 16th, 2010 01:33 pm (UTC)
I'm not sure hypocrisy is too strong a word. And I think you're absolutely right -- he's terrified, every time, that this will be the screwup that drives them away. In that panic, he doesn't remember that after George hit him, he understood and supported him. He doesn't remember that Annie's rampage through the funeral parlor led to her learning vital information that she promptly brought to him.

it reminds me of a line in an ep of s3 West Wing, where Leo's talking about being a recovering addict. he says something like the first time you come out of rehab everyone's all supportive, but fall off the wagon, go into rehab and come back out, everyone turns their back. Same idea, I think.

It doesn't make a lot of sense-- watch the next 2 and you'll see why-- but I think it's what he's doing.

He doesn't understand why they still believe in him, and therefore can't trust that they will continue to do so. With that disconnect, it's very difficult for any response he has to make sense.


There's also a further factor that you haven't seen yet which, well...the scenes are brilliant.
wiliqueen
Mar. 16th, 2010 01:39 pm (UTC)
but fall off the wagon, go into rehab and come back out, everyone turns their back. Same idea, I think.

Even though they, and George in particular, have proven that they will still stand by him. I'm sure he's had more experience of the reverse, and consequently part of him is just waiting for them to stop being the exception to the rule.

There's also a further factor that you haven't seen yet which, well...the scenes are brilliant.

I'll take your word for it.

And of course you replied before I edited my previous comment to add that of course you're right about his protectiveness of them being a big factor. After all, he spent half of S1 trying to protect Annie from her own secrets.
thanatos_kalos
Mar. 16th, 2010 03:49 pm (UTC)
He and Annie also spend part of s1 protecting George from knowledge about Whatever that lies Beyond. She's terrified in 1.5 that he'll look, and one gets the impression that Mitchell's seen enough of Whatever to know that George can't see it and remain a believer. I think he could handle George leaving or even dying more than his losing his...soul, essence, whatever.
wiliqueen
Mar. 16th, 2010 03:57 pm (UTC)
Yes. George's faith is very important to him. I don't know if you've seen the pilot, but it's actually made explicit there. George (in a moment of existential "this can't be all there is" distress) asks Annie about her experience when she died. She point-blank lies to his face, and Mitchell tells her she was right to do so. "He doesn't need to know."

There's also that near-imperceptible headshake Mitchell gives her when George asks her what she told Owen. They have a strongly-implied agreement to protect George from that knowledge, and he still feels the need to remind her of it.
thanatos_kalos
Mar. 16th, 2010 11:58 pm (UTC)
I've seen the pilot, yeah. Which is why it's so interesting to me that we don't see the Star after 2.4. It's on the floor (lit so it's clear) when George is in the cage at the end, but he doesn't have it later that I've seen. I'm wondering if his strong faith isn't why his star works on par with the usual Christian anti-occult/vampire symbols; there seems to be an emotional component to it as well (as Mitchell can hold George's Star because of George's affection for him).
wiliqueen
Mar. 17th, 2010 12:06 am (UTC)
we don't see the Star after 2.4. It's on the floor (lit so it's clear) when George is in the cage at the end, but he doesn't have it later that I've seen

I'm ashamed of myself that I hadn't noticed that until you mentioned it. Though (except for when he went ultra-dork for the attempted bad date with Kirsty) he usually wears it inside his shirt, so I don't think I've had a reason to observe its absence.

I'm immensely pleased by the strong implication all along the way that personal faith and intent lie behind the effect of religious symbols/artifacts in this universe. It's always made far more sense to me to do it that way. (Says the Universalist neo-pagan, granted, but still.)

Which also makes it very, very interesting that Mitchell made love to Lucy and slept like a baby in her bed, all with a huge honkin' cross on the wall.

Edited at 2010-03-17 12:13 am (UTC)
diannelamerc
Mar. 17th, 2010 01:13 am (UTC)
Well, he always takes it off when he changes (and, as you pointed out, traditionally gives it to Mitchell for safekeeping) and I didn't notice it being *gone* after that... he does usually wear it inside the shirt. Is it clearly missing after 2.4, or did we just not see it?

I also love the personal intent/faith component of the religious symbols and the way they're used. I also tend to assume a touch of psychosomatic effect in them (if someone feels that they have actively betraying their Christian faith, it makes sense for a symbol of that faith to effect them negatively).

But yeah, I hadn't noticed him sleeping under the cross, but that just adds to the "intent" theory--she wasn't wielding it at him (and he may not have noticed it), which made it a non-issue. (He also presumably didn't vamp out, and both intended and actually caused her no harm--possibly also relevant?)
wiliqueen
Mar. 17th, 2010 01:19 am (UTC)
If we saw it in ep 5, I didn't notice it, but it's very prominent in the morning. Amazing shot composition there -- Lucy searching her own face in the mirror, with the dent of Mitchell's head in the pillow behind her and the cross on the wall above the mirror.

The multiple layers of possible implications are so cool.

Edited at 2010-03-17 02:07 am (UTC)
diannelamerc
Mar. 17th, 2010 02:11 am (UTC)
As Mel pointed out to me, in 2.7 there are several opportunities to see it, and it's not in evidence. Events also conspire such that he may well have lost it in this ep.
thanatos_kalos
Mar. 17th, 2010 01:33 am (UTC)
When George dresses in 2.7 post-transformation he's not wearing the Star, nor does it appear on the floor that I can see. And given the circumstances which you'll see...it's rather significant.
diannelamerc
Mar. 17th, 2010 01:52 am (UTC)
E-me, because I've seen the whole season and I don't want to spoil Val :)...but I can't think of what you mean...
thanatos_kalos
Mar. 17th, 2010 02:06 am (UTC)
Done! :)
diannelamerc
Mar. 17th, 2010 02:13 am (UTC)
(Having watched the last four straight in a row, they have a tendency to blur together in my head :)
wiliqueen
Mar. 17th, 2010 02:20 am (UTC)
I came really close to watching the last three in a chunk and letting brainiacfive suffer, but decided it's more fun to wait for him.

Which has had the dubious benefit of giving me a day or two in between each to write ridiculously long LJ posts (because work is kicking his ass) but is also driving me INSANE.
thanatos_kalos
Mar. 17th, 2010 12:19 pm (UTC)
Watch the last 2 together... *tempt, tempt*
wiliqueen
Mar. 17th, 2010 02:03 pm (UTC)
Probably will tonight, since we never got to 7 last night. (You seem to be laboring under the misapprehension that I didn't spend all last evening vibrating with impatience.)

Edited at 2010-03-17 02:12 pm (UTC)
wiliqueen
Mar. 16th, 2010 03:10 pm (UTC)
In that panic, he doesn't remember that after George hit him, he understood and supported him.

And I forgot to add... I think Mitchell missed that George hit him at least as much for lying about Lauren as for actually feeding on/recruiting her. And that's a really, really key thing to miss.

Edited at 2010-03-16 03:11 pm (UTC)
thanatos_kalos
Mar. 16th, 2010 03:50 pm (UTC)
Oh, very much so.
studiesinlight
Aug. 5th, 2010 12:35 am (UTC)
BH S2 Ep6
>"After one bumpy ep, very definitely back full-force to the show I fell in love with."

It's very interesting that you felt this way about the sixth episode. I did not.

I felt much more that while Annie had somehow recovered season one -- I liked her plot with the psychic, the other ghosts, and her mother a very great deal; best thing this season after George and Nina's phone call -- the dreary, dull offensiveness of the human bad guys reached a new low as they broke out of their generic theism and established them as Anglicans. And Mitchell is an idiot.

It's so ickily pointless, the bad guys' crusade -- double meaning intended -- against supernatural beings, and the writers seem to have no understanding even that it is pointless and requires explanation that they're not providing. Why would Christianity lead this character and his goons to three decades of vengeance, extermination, persecution of collective guilt, instead of forgiveness, toleration, efforts for care and conversion? If they want to invoke historical precedent, they should go ahead and invoke it. Their assumptions are poor writing.

>"Molly's nightmare certainly raises some questions there. Unless, of course, there's a talent that was already operating and this just happens to be the first we're seeing."

It may be unfair to the Molly character, especially after her wise-child session with George about his lie and his freakishness, but with that scene, I began wondering whether the show is daring enough to call its own "genetic origin of evil" bluff with an evil child.

>"Sam is sweet and levelheaded and maybe sells herself short a bit, so we have that much, but I still don't feel like there's much I can get a handle on there."

Plus, George doesn't love her. He cares about her. It's not the same. She and Molly deserve better. (And that's not even including that we know, out here in viewer land, that George will eventually get back together with Nina.)

I was a child of a single parent who had to watch her only parent start dating again at about Molly's age. As a single adult now, I couldn't bring myself to date someone with children, because I remember what it felt like to be those children -- to have adults wander in and out of my life, some kind and some freezing, my opinions of them meaning nothing at all. I'm with the Lorelei character from Gilmore Girls; you don't bring the date into the child's home until you're all but engaged.

>"I think the boys know that, at least to some degree, which is why they just accept things like phone chargers hidden in ovens."

:-) Every boy should have a sister. :-)

Yeah, the Annie stuff in the sixth episode is outstanding.
wiliqueen
Aug. 5th, 2010 01:02 am (UTC)
Re: BH S2 Ep6
It's very interesting that you felt this way about the sixth episode. I did not.

I'm sorry about that, and certainly understand why. For me, writing that in the immediate post-watching flush, it felt like they were connecting to each other again for the first time in ages. Even with Mitchell being an idiot and keeping secrets; what he's hiding is more dire, but that just makes him more likely to hide it. I don't know how they're going to break of him of that, but wow, is it necessary.

And, of course, it felt like they had each rediscovered their "yes, I can," even if it manifested as unwise choices.

Why would Christianity lead this character and his goons

I give the writers the benefit of the doubt that it isn't leading him, but that he's twisted it in the image of his own obsession and inflicted it on others. But as you say, there are assumptions made that people will know how to read it, and there's no guarantee of that. A lot of things needed to be clarified and specified much more than they were in order for the whole concept of Kemp to really work. I got to where I can make him work, but that's far from the same thing.

Plus, George doesn't love her. He cares about her. It's not the same. She and Molly deserve better.

Yes. Absolutely.

I began wondering whether the show is daring enough to call its own "genetic origin of evil" bluff with an evil child.

It didn't occur to me to wonder that on first viewing, but I do think they were doing some ambiguous telegraphing there.
( 34 comments — Leave a comment )

Profile

sugarplum
wiliqueen
Valerie - Postmodern Pollyanna
WiliQueen's Woods

Latest Month

November 2016
S M T W T F S
  12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930   

Tags

Powered by LiveJournal.com
Designed by chasethestars