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Memo to the world at large

The model for Mary in Rossetti's Ecce Ancilla Domini was his sister Christina. (Yes, the one who wrote "Goblin Market" and "In the Bleak Midwinter," among other things.) He painted her hair red because that's what he wanted, but it was done before he ever met Lizzie. No, really.

I don't so much mind Desperate Romantics fudging it, because they're conflating all sorts of things and it's just a big old costume romp anyway. But people on blogs and boards discussing supposed fact? ANNOYING.

(This pointless rant brought to you by Val having too many Google Alerts set up.)

Comments

( 6 comments — Leave a comment )
studiesinlight
Feb. 3rd, 2010 07:09 am (UTC)
I love that I could say "PRB" to you, and you'd know what I was talking about.

Which reminds me that I was going to tell you about a book I received for Christmas, with Victorian English women's poetry facing Victorian English paintings. (It's a gift book, so it foolishly has "Romantic" in the title, but it means 'ship, not the era or the style. ~g~)
wiliqueen
Feb. 3rd, 2010 02:27 pm (UTC)
Well, of course. All things Victorian are little-'r' romantic. They have no other relevance, don'cha know. *snerk*

Other than that, how's the book?
thanatos_kalos
Feb. 3rd, 2010 03:35 pm (UTC)
::g:: this is exactly why I never go on blogs about telly featuring the Classical world.
wiliqueen
Feb. 4th, 2010 10:15 pm (UTC)
I think I would have been less annoyed had the poster not been all snarky with something about Lizzie's face everywhere being "too much of a so-so thing," when he posted two paintings and only one of them was actually her. It's not like he couldn't have found a zillion examples without breaking a sweat - Gabriel WAS obsessive for several years there, and did literally hundreds of random pencil sketches of her, many of which are extant.

Deliver us from morons on the intarwebz. *eyeroll*
studiesinlight
Mar. 28th, 2010 01:56 am (UTC)
(I'm up to the end of the fourth episode now.)

A thought less about the show than about Rossetti's actual work:

I would not hold it against a casual viewer -- or casual historian, for that matter -- to suppose that Rossetti had one model all his life, and painted her over and over and over... (Okay, except that portrait of May as a child. And a few others. But.) The way he idealized his adult women models to a particular standard in his own imagination... Given them cold, I speculate that an unfamiliar viewer might be hard pressed to sort all the formal, finished Lizzie paintings into one pile and all the Jane ones into another based on anything but hair. (Sketches are more individualized, granted. And Fanny has a different look. Etc. But.)

This does not defend the annoying people making the mistake on PRB forums! :-) Just something I've been thinking about.

Back to the show: good gracious golly, "Bubbles"! of his grandson! decades in the future! contemporary with "The Scapegoat"! contemporary, apparently, with "The Vision of Dante"! These guys will have no works left to create soon. No sequels here... :-)
wiliqueen
Mar. 28th, 2010 02:08 am (UTC)
Given them cold, I speculate that an unfamiliar viewer might be hard pressed to sort all the formal, finished Lizzie paintings into one pile and all the Jane ones into another based on anything but hair.

This is true. Both Mary paintings are so different to my eye from anything he did later (and just so glaringly Christina), but I've looked at them all so much for so long.

I'd have been less annoyed, I think, but the particular forum post that sparked this mini-rant was rather snarkily about being tired of seeing Lizzie.

And yes, the guys in DR appear to be living their lives on a ball of Sam Beckett's theoretical string. *g*
( 6 comments — Leave a comment )

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