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All right, that's it.

:: pushes up sleeves ::

I'm now down to backing up up all my files, wiping my C: drive, and reinstalling Windows from scratch. Maybe that will make it stop asking me at startup if I want it to look for the drivers I disabled and deleted for hardware that is NOT EVEN THERE. And maybe then Premiere will stop crashing and automatically rebooting every time I try to open the Movie Capture window. :: growls at ATI ::

While the files copy, however, I'm gonna make icons. :-)

Comments

( 13 comments — Leave a comment )
bktheirregular
Oct. 14th, 2004 06:45 pm (UTC)
growl!

Stupid ATI. I had to do the same thing when I made the mistake of getting the ATI TV-Wonder. :(

(and no, Virgina, the answer is not always to get a Mac...)
wiliqueen
Oct. 14th, 2004 06:57 pm (UTC)
What's killing me is the AIW capture driver is one of the things it's looking for, and the card I bought doesn't even have capture capability. Apparently they just throw everything and the kitchen sink into their software, whether or not it's applicable and whether or not it conflicts with the hardward you already have for that purpose. *scowl*

(and no, Virgina, the answer is not always to get a Mac...)

I only wish I could. *sigh* But we finally cried uncle on that one. Not that they don't have their own issues. :-/
bktheirregular
Oct. 14th, 2004 07:01 pm (UTC)
I know. Would you believe that as Unofficial Tech Guy at the New Jersey Office of Save the World Inc., I'm also getting asked to solve problems on iBooks and Powerbooks that the volunteers bring in?

As for ATI ... I've been impressed with their video-OUT card (as opposed to nVidia's offerings), but their capture cards? Suck. Hard. Vacuum.
wiliqueen
Oct. 14th, 2004 07:18 pm (UTC)
As for ATI ... I've been impressed with their video-OUT card

That's what I bought. But when I installed it, suddenly I had the AIW capture driver and assorted other crap I don't need or want gumming up the works.

All I wanted was a plain vanilla display card that happened to use my AGP slot so I could free up a PCI slot and have decent sound. Instead I've spent five days at war with drivers that don't even apply to the hardware they came with! I don't care how good the card itself is or isn't, that's just plain shoddy.
bktheirregular
Oct. 14th, 2004 07:28 pm (UTC)
*wince* Oh, boy. My amateur tech-support genes are kicking in ...

Weird. Because from what I can see at the ATI site, there's one driver package for the standard video card and another driver package for All-In-Wonder. You never had an ATI capture card?
wiliqueen
Oct. 14th, 2004 07:55 pm (UTC)
Nope. Only capture card I've ever had is my trusty Bravado, which this garbage has incapacitated.

You'd think there'd be no reason for the capture driver to be on the disk that came with the display card. I was certainly shocked to see it listed when I went into the System control panel to figure out what the frell was going on.

My old display card is also an ATI, actually, but it's never given me any conflict problems. Probably because I think it predates their capture products.

This whole thing is just bizarre.
bktheirregular
Oct. 14th, 2004 08:02 pm (UTC)
Hm. Maybe time for a different answer? One thing I did last time I did a wipe-and-reinstall was to flat-out ignore the drivers that came on CD with the video card. I just downloaded the Catalyst driver pack from www.ati.com, burned it to CD, and when it came time to reinstall, used that instead of the original driver CD.

Pain in the mivonks, I know. But since you're already doing a massive backup...
bktheirregular
Oct. 14th, 2004 08:04 pm (UTC)
Sorry, one more thing. ATI apparently also has a driver-cleaner utility at the website, that'll supposedly scrub off all the ATI drivers on your system. What OS are you using again?
wiliqueen
Oct. 15th, 2004 06:59 am (UTC)
Win98. *chuckle* I'll keep that in mind in case I run into this again, but I already did the clean reinstall last night. Thanks, tho.

I should have looked more thoroughly at ATI's site, but I think I was too annoyed with them to trust anything else they had to offer. :-}
wiliqueen
Oct. 15th, 2004 06:57 am (UTC)
It's a possibility to consider, although at this point I'm more inclined to cut my losses, return this wretched thing, and get a different brand of AGP card. But I'm not going to experiment with anything else until I'm sure I have things back the way they belong from before all this started on Sunday.

My old display card (which I put back in) works perfectly fine. I just want the darn PCI slot it's occupying.
mitai
Oct. 15th, 2004 07:01 am (UTC)
Before you do all that . . . =)
I see it up there, but I feel I should chime in - the very first thing you should do, if you have two video cards installed, which it sounds like you do, is go into Device Mangler and 'delete' them both. This removes the hardware and drivers. Then reboot. Upon reboot, you will see Windows 'detect' the hardware and prompt you for drivers. If it installs them automagically, not a big deal. If it prompts you, tell it to cancel and ignore them.

Go to the appropriate vendor website, go to their Support section, select the EXACT hardware you have installed in your machine, if you know, and go to Downloads, or Drivers, or whatever looks good. You want to download the specific driver exactly, screw the installation CD. Installation CDs come with a bunch of proprietary crap that no one ever uses or needs. I HATE installation CDs. HP installation CDs are the worst. Downloaded drivers do not, because the vendor will be worried about download times for dial-up users and strip all the crap out.

Now that you have both the drivers you need (and you likely will not need any extra tools, you want hardware drivers specifically) go ahead and run them, rather than pointing the hardware to them in Device Mangler. Both drivers should have come as .exe or Setup files, and go ahead and double-click them. They will run, they will tell you whether or not they are the right driver for the hardware you have. Watch them install, then reboot time.

When you reboot, you should not be prompted for additional drivers for crap you do not have. IF YOU ARE, since it sounds like you just got this card, call the vendor. You've got a 90-day warranty AT LEAST for support, call those mofos and ask them what the hell is up with their product. Rebuilding should be your last option because at this point you don't know whether or not the hardware is good, and a rebuild might give you the same symptoms as you're having now.

Which could make you very, very angry. =)

If you need help, keep in mind I do this for a living for a very large center, and have certifications coming out of my ears. I'm on AIM right now as jayamitai, if you run into anything weird please just drop me a /msg and wait paitently, because I'm home right now, cleaning my house, and will be checking periodically. =)
wiliqueen
Oct. 15th, 2004 08:16 am (UTC)
Re: Before you do all that . . . =)
if you have two video cards installed, which it sounds like you do,

Strictly speaking, no. I currently have a regular video (i.e. display) card in a PCI slot (ATI 64somethingorother from about 1997), and a capture-only card (which is neither intended nor used to run the display) in another PCI slot (Bravado 1000, from 1995). I've been running the system with these two together for years with no conflicts.

This is what I reverted to after the new display card (ATI Radeon 7000), which I bought to put in my vacant AGP slot and free up the PCI slot, caused the headaches I've been having all week. I never had both cards physically in the machine at the same time, and removed the driver for the old one as soon as the new one was up and running my monitor. Once that was accomplished, I happily ran my machine with the new card for about half an hour, at which point I discovered Premiere wouldn't work with my capture card anymore, and the fun began. *sigh*

Sorry all this wasn't clear about that -- what happens when I'm just ranting and not providing actual info. ;-)

Upon reboot, you will see Windows 'detect' the hardware and prompt you for drivers. If it installs them automagically, not a big deal. If it prompts you, tell it to cancel and ignore them.

I lost count of the number of times I did this. :-P

Go to the appropriate vendor website, go to their Support section, select the EXACT hardware you have installed

I'll probably try this once I'm sure I have things back the way they were, just to remove as many variables as possible. It would be nice if I could actually use the $*(#& card I bought, because I've had a new sound card waiting for that PCI slot for close to a year. :-P I never even got as far as trying to install that this week...

Believe me, if it paid any attention when I disabled and then removed the drivers in the Device Manager and Multimedia control panels, I would have been back to my starting point on Monday. :-(

When you reboot, you should not be prompted for additional drivers for crap you do not have.

And yet. *scowl* I felt like I was in the frelling Twilight Zone, being prompted for drivers for a card that was sitting right next to me in its box! Not to mention additional drivers that don't even apply to said card. I have no idea why it thought it should be looking for the capture driver for the All-in-Wonder card, which has never even been in the same building as my computer.

IF YOU ARE, since it sounds like you just got this card, call the vendor. You've got a 90-day warranty AT LEAST for support, call those mofos and ask them what the hell is up with their product.

From what I've read online, they either don't know or don't care. Possibly both. This from a scary number of people who paid long-distances charges to Canada to get nothing more helpful than "reinstall the driver." That pretty much decided me not to even bother with that avenue. :-/

wiliqueen
Oct. 15th, 2004 08:17 am (UTC)
Re: Before you do all that . . . =)
Part 2 (because LJ thought my reply was too long for some odd reason):

Rebuilding should be your last option

Yup. *sigh* Although it's not as much of a pain as it could be; I have a physical D: drive the same size as my C: drive, so it's pretty easy to just dump all my files on there, and selectively put them back in the rebuild process. That way I know what's going onto the system when, so if/when problems crop up, it's much much easier to trace the source.

Plus, I'm one of those people who keep all their downloaded installer files in one folder forever, and all their installer CDs in one place. *g* So putting all my software back is mildly time-consuming, but easy. I formatted and reloaded last night, and am already about 2/3 of the way back to normal. All in all, much less hassle than trying to track down what little files were hiding somewhere to give me these headaches all week.

because at this point you don't know whether or not the hardware is good,

Doesn't matter, because the hardware hasn't been in the machine since Monday. The new card hasn't, anyway. If something I've been using all along has gone *spuh*, then getting the same symptoms after a clean reinstall is about the only way to know.

Thank you for the offer of help. I may yet take you up on it, but hopefully this will do it.
( 13 comments — Leave a comment )

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